A Wrinkle in Time: Building a Black Hole for Interstellar

Light around a wormhole doesn't behave classically—it doesn't travel in a straight line. Rogers describes a wormhole as "a crystal ball reflecting the universe, a spherical hole in space-time." (Diagram Credit: Kip Thorne, Wired)

Light around a wormhole doesn’t behave classically—it doesn’t travel in a straight line. Rogers describes a wormhole as “a crystal ball reflecting the universe, a spherical hole in space-time.” (Diagram Credit: Kip Thorne, Wired)

Adam Rogers recently wrote a beautiful piece for Wired discussing how astrophysicist Kip Thorne’s equations helped to create a scientifically realistic black hole model. Rogers explains, “Thorne sees truth. Nolan, the consummate image maker, sees beauty.” His words remind me of the closing lines of John Keats’ “Ode on a Grecian Urn”:

‘Beauty is truth, truth beauty,—that is all
    Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.’

Rogers himself concludes, “Most Interstellar viewers will see these images—the wormhole, the black hole, the weird light—and think, ‘Whoa. That’s beautiful.’ Thorne looks at them and thinks, ‘Whoa. That’s true.’ And from a certain perspective, that’s beautiful too.”

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