Update on Camelopardalids

The May Camelopardalids’ peak did not reach the predicted rate of 200 meteors per hour but instead averaged around 5 to 6 meteors per hour last night. Here is what some of the various astronomy Web sites are saying about the shower, in hindsight…

SpaceWeather.com:

Although this [the 5 to 10 meteors per hour] is a far cry from predictions, it is hardly a surprise. The parent comet, 209P/LINEAR, is faint and currently produces only a small amount of dust. Most forecasters acknowledged that there might be less dust in Earth’s path than the models suggested.

Another possibility is that the shower is not a dud, just delayed. If models mis-located the debris zone, an outburst could still occur later on May 24th.

Universe Today:

Based on a few reports via e-mail and my own vigil of two and a half hours centered on the predicted maximum of 2 a.m. CDT (7 UT) Saturday morning the Camelopardalid meteor shower did not bring down the house. BUT it did produce some unusually slow meteors and (from my site) one exception fireball with a train that lasted more than 20 minutes.

Nevertheless, several observers shared their meteor shower photos:

Camelopardalid

Cat Connor caught some meteors Friday night – the night of the Camelopardalid shower – over Mono Lake in California. The double streak on the left in this shot might be the upper stage of Japan’s Daichi-2 booster venting fuel. Read more at Phil Plait’s Bad Astronomer blog.

camelopardalid

Steve Lacy caught this beautiful fireball the night of the Camelopardalid meteor shower.

Many people saw fireballs, or very bright meteors, on the night of the Camelopardalid meteor shower. This one is from Kevin Palmer, who was observing from Green River State Wildlife Area in Illinois.

Many people saw fireballs, or very bright meteors, on the night of the Camelopardalid meteor shower. This one is from Kevin Palmer, who was observing from Green River State Wildlife Area in Illinois.

Screen Shot 2014-05-30 at 6.53.25 PM

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